19.12.11

Triump of democracy and civilian rule must previal

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Gilani, at least on this point is right, there IS no room for military rule in Pakistan, ever again.

The Pakistan military through the careful guidance of the British Raj created ISI since 1948 have been the main source of fundamental and dire strategic mistakes that have incrementally taken the great nation of Pakistan down the road of failure after failure..........to failed state number das (as of 2011).

The rent a crowd fundies who canvass for the Pakistan military are but puppets who are also in addition a major part of the problem in Pakistan.

Of course such supreme truths could have come from a better source than a PM whose shadow-in-purda boss conspired with a foreign entity to stay in power for ever, based on the corrupt largess of the USA, even despite the fact that 90% of Pakistanis hate Zardari no end for obvious reasons. How does one justify staying in power through malicious devious means when the masses do not want them?

Graceful exit? Then fresh elections.

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Pakistan Islamists Hold Massive Pro-Military Rally in Lahore

Clerics Condemn Zardari Over Rumored 'Coup' Attempt

by Jason Ditz antiwar.com

Some 30,000 Islamist demonstrators from the Jamaat-ud Dawa (JuD) took to the streets of Lahore today, expressing solidarity with the Pakistani military at a time when military and civilian government seem increasingly at odds.

The rally was seen chiefly as an expression of support for the military after the US attack on a pair of military bases on November 26, with clerics also bringing up the “coup memo” from the Zardari government seeking to oust much of the military’s leadership and replace them with more pro-US officials.

Prime Minister Yousef Raza Gilani has attempted to shrug off rumors of a coup, dismissing both the allegations against Zardari and growing speculation that the military may move to oust him, saying there is “no room for a martial law in Pakistan.

Pakistan’s military has a long history of coups, and while Gen. Parvez Kayani, the current military chief, has shown a rare level of opposition to military intervention in politics the growing split seems liable to provoke a reaction, if not from him, then from another top military official.