17.11.15

Legacy of the Gaylen networks and relationship since 1948, and the Cold War that has to be broken.

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The bulk of the massive spying by the BND for the CIA and NSA is related to industrial espionage, which costs Germany $100 billion each year.

Try multiplying that figure since 1945 by German traitors for the USA.

At another level the BND acts as an over enthusiastic foot soldier of SECURITY MATTERS for American intelligence, over zealous with their work attempting to please their masters.....even if it means providing FALSE intelligence, or wrong intelligence against the Eastern Bloc Communist states, and lately the Balkans, Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria. Maybe they will go into Africa looking for the elusive CIA created ISIS, and now near forgotten al-Qaeda.

The prosecution of the Neanderthal traitor from the BND is under the meme.."A few bad apples....but DON'T WORRY FOLKS, nothing to see here, the BND essentially does its job, filled with decent hard working people who only drive Volkswagen Passats."

But of course that is not the case. The capture of one unlucky traitor taking a mere $100,000 for his services is not the true situation. The problem is the organization itself, and its overall culture since the 1940's after WWII......Which cannot be changed by charging a 'few bad apples'.


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German on trial accused of giving CIA 200 secret documents


A former employee of Germany's BND foreign intelligence agency who is charged with treason gave the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) 200 secret documents, prosecutors said at the start of his trial on Monday.
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The arrest last year of the man, identified as Markus R., cooled relations between Berlin and Washington, close allies during the Cold War and afterwards, and followed revelations that the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) snooped on Germany.
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The 32-year-old man, who has suffered from a disability since early childhood that affects his mobility, is accused of passing information to the CIA from 2008 until mid-2014 in return for at least 95,000 euros ($102,000).
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He received the money from a handler named as Craig during meetings in Salzburg and other Austrian cities, prosecutors said. "At the BND I had the impression that nobody found me credible," the defendant told the Munich court.
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 "With the CIA it was different. One could prove himself."
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Known as Uwe to his handlers, who included a CIA agent named Alex, Markus R.
provided the Americans with details on the BND's structure, key activities, deliberations and collaboration with foreign spy agencies, prosecutors told the court.
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They said the CIA gave him a notebook with a special email program, which he used to provide the agency with almost weekly updates. In mid-2014, Markus R. also handed over three documents to the Russian consulate in Munich, they said.
Wearing a dark gray suit, Markus R. appeared shy as he answered questions put forward by the judge. He grew up in former East Germany with a locksmith father and a mother who worked as a precision mechanic. He had an interest in computers.
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Arrested in July last year, he was charged on Aug. 11 this year on two counts of treason, breaking official secrets and corruption. A guilty verdict could mean a life sentence.
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Markus R. had worked from December 2007 for the BND and soon afterwards offered help to the CIA, prosecutors said. From May 2008 until his arrest, he worked in a department responsible for the protection of soldiers serving abroad, with access to sensitive material.
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The documents he passed to the Russian consulate in Munich also posed a security risk to Germany, prosecutors said.
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Fugitive former NSA contractor Edward Snowden revealed two years ago the extent of U.S. surveillance in Germany, which included bugging the phone of Chancellor Angela Merkel.
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(Reporting by Joern Poltz; Writing by Joseph Nasr; Editing by Mark Heinrich)